Holiday Cottages in Lostwithiel

Lostwithiel is centrally located between coast and moorland - just 6 miles east of the Eden Project and 5 miles from Fowey, it is an ideal base location for exploring. It is situated at the tidal reach of the River Fowey in beautiful wooded surroundings. The name Lostwithiel comes from two Cornish words meaning the place at the end of the woodland.

Lostwithiel was a 'new town' around 800 years ago, when the Normans used the town in the export of tin. The town soon became the second busiest port on the south coast of England and was known as The Port of Fawi.

In the thirteenth century, Lostwithiel became the county's capital after development by the Earls of Cornwall. The town's medieval church and bridge still stand today. However, there was much rebuilding of the town during the late seventeenth century, after many buildings were destroyed during the Civil War.

Lostwithiel Museum is located in the old Corn Exchange building, and has a very interesting collection portraying life in the town over the last two centuries. The town also has a golf and country club, tennis courts, swimming pool and squash courts. The Camel cycle trail is not far away, and the coastal path is also nearby.

One mile upriver from Lostwithiel stands Restormel Castle, originally built by the Normans. The Black Prince lived here briefly in 1354. In the late thirteenth century, it was re-built by Edmund, Earl of Cornwall. The castle now belongs to the Duchy of Cornwall and run by English Heritage. The castle is open to the public and is host to various events throughout the year.

Antique shops, regular fairs and auctions have made Lostwithiel the antiques capital of Cornwall. Now, with a choice of recently opened lifestyle shops, award winning restaurants, tea rooms, pubs and produce market, the town is attracting a growing number of new visitors. With good road and rail links as well as ample free parking, visiting couldn't be easier.

View our guide to Lostwithiel in South East Cornwall

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